<html dir="ltr"><head></head><body style="text-align:left; direction:ltr;"><div>On Wed, 2020-11-25 at 13:28 +0000, Paul Allen wrote:</div><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr">On Wed, 25 Nov 2020 at 13:15, Phake Nick <<a href="mailto:c933103@gmail.com">c933103@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br></div><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote type="cite" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex; border-left:2px #729fcf solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto">I don't thibk it is appropriate to add one-off temporary facilities into OSM.</div><br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>How temporary is temporary?  All of man's works eventually crumble and</div><div>decay.  No man-made feature is permanent.  On a long enough timescale,</div><div>no geological feature is permanent either.<br></div><div><br></div><div>We shouldn't map a one-off.  But such facilities are likely to operate for months,</div><div>if not years.  Testing and vaccination facilities are generally not located in</div><div>places like hospitals and doctors to minimize infection.  Often open-air</div><div>for the same reason, which means they are going to be building=roof</div><div>or building=marquee.  Most won't be constructed to last decades but</div><div>will be there for many months.</div><div><br></div></div></div></blockquote><div>Although in this case I would expect the approach to be to set up sessions for schools, universities and at larger employers and for the general population it will simply attend an appointment at their local medical centre.</div><div><br></div><div>Phil (trigpoint)</div></body></html>