<html><head><meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"></head><body dir="auto"><br><br><div dir="ltr">sent from a phone</div><div dir="ltr"><br><blockquote type="cite">On 2 Jan 2021, at 21:45, Mateusz Konieczny via Tagging <tagging@openstreetmap.org> wrote:<br></blockquote></div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>Jan 2, 2021, 21:25 by voschix@gmail.com:<br></div><blockquote class="tutanota_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid #93A3B8; padding-left: 10px; margin-left: 5px;"><div dir="ltr"><div>I see no problem with the "segregated" key.<br></div><div>It is only applicable to paths that carry explicit signs for bicycle=designated and foot=designted.<br></div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>+1<div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>I would not go so far, explicit segregated=no on highway=footway bicycle=yes<br></div><div>is not incorrect<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>maybe there are exceptions in some jurisdictions, but from what I am used to, the segregated tag makes sense on bicycle=designated paths only. A footway with bicycle=yes cannot be segregated, otherwise the “bicycle“ would be designated </div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="tutanota_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid #93A3B8; padding-left: 10px; margin-left: 5px;"><div dir="ltr"><div>It should be surface-independent, because there are (infrequent) cases of unpaved segregated foot-cyclepaths (I have seen them in parks). <br></div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>+1</div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>How the segregation looks like in such cases? Lane "painted" with other color of gravel? <br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>it does not matter </div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="tutanota_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid #93A3B8; padding-left: 10px; margin-left: 5px;"><div dir="ltr"><div>I have also seen cases of segregated foot-cycle paths where the pedestrians have pavement, and the cyclists do not, or vice versa.<br></div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>how do you know it is the same carriageway in these cases?</div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="tutanota_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid #93A3B8; padding-left: 10px; margin-left: 5px;"><div dir="ltr">Your first example (<span style="font-weight:normal"><span class="size" style="font-size:13px">Réserve naturelle nationale de la baie de Somme</span></span><span class="size" style="font-size:13px">)</span> looks like a highway=track; motor_vehicle=no/private. Are you sure that it is a designated foot-cycle-path.<br></div></blockquote><div>I have seen path exactly like that (not this one, it was an example photo as taking<br></div><div>one was not feasible), correctly tagged as highway=footway + bicycle=yes<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>I agree with Volker that the picture probably shows a track. For bicycle=yes segregated does not make sense to me (see above)</div><div><br></div><div><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><blockquote class="tutanota_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid #93A3B8; padding-left: 10px; margin-left: 5px;"><div dir="ltr"><div>In some parks rules, including "no vehicles, except bicycles" are signposted.</div></div></blockquote></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div>this would be bicycle=designated, not?</div><div><br></div><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div dir="ltr"><div>bicycle=permissive is incorrect tag in cases where cycling is illegal but tolerated and it</div><div>is anyway not applicable in this case as cycling is explicitly legal.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>I guess “illegal” is not the right term, it seems too strong. Anyway, if cycling isn’t allowed but tolerated, permissive is the value we use around here (central Italy)</div><div><br></div></div><div><br></div><div>Cheers Martin </div></body></html>