[talk-au] What gives with roundabouts?

Ian Sergeant isergean at hih.com.au
Wed Dec 10 22:56:46 GMT 2008


Hi Darrin,

Over the past few years, there is no doubt in my mind that the consensus on
the Australian mailing list, and in practice in Australia, has been to use
mini-roundabouts to indicate the concrete structure within the width of the
road. You can (of course) reasonably disagree with this, but people mapping
this way are doing it because they think that it is the best
respresentation - and not because of any form of "laziness".

You wrote:

> No, but I'm sure there's NO roundabouts in the rest of the world like a
> mini-roundabout by the 'Australian' definition, rather a myopic view (In
> reality I suspect they are in fact the most common type of all, since
> they're cheap).

No, I don't think so.  Australian style roundabouts aren't at all common in
the UK or the USA.

In the UK just about all the roundabouts are larger, causing you to turn
into the roundabout.  Its a separate road construction, and not a bit of
concrete in the middle of the road.

In the USA, I can honestly say I have never seen one.  They may exist, but
they must be rare.  They are more equivalent to a 4-way stop in North
America, then they are to a UK roundabout IMO.

> If we follow this reasoning the nothing we put in OSM
> need follow the front page if we don't feel like it and suddenly OSM
> looks a bit useless because each person's local area means different
> things.

This discussion has been had many times before.  Possibly there is more
than one way of finding the best way and achieving consensus than a poorly
supported voting process.

Note that the renderer developers, in reality, hold more sway than any
amount of map features votes.

There are lots of Australian and state features which are mapped onto UK
based map features which they were never intended for.  NSW freeways,
tertiary, unclassified, etc, are not Australian definitions.  They have to
be mapped onto Australian features.  There is nothing wrong with doing this
to make the most representative Australian map.

Ian.





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