[talk-au] Active Australian OSM contributors in light of CT/license changes

James Andrewartha trs80 at student.uwa.edu.au
Sun Jul 10 15:04:34 BST 2011


On 8 July 2011 18:08, SteveC <steve at asklater.com> wrote:
> On Jul 8, 2011, at 2:57, Sam Couter <sam at couter.id.au> wrote:
>
>> Steve Coast <steve at asklater.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> We've gone to insanely long lengths to make that the case, including getting
>>> clarifications from Ordnance Survey, Nearmap and many others. As far as I'm
>>> aware there are no remaining issues as to why you can't click 'accept'.
>>
>> The solution to the problem of "We chose a licence and impose terms on
>> contributors that's incompatible with most sources of data" isn't to go
>> to each source of data individually to try to get them to relicence.
>> That's as ridiculous as choosing a GPL-incompatible software licence and
>> then whining that you can't legally incorporate all those wonderful GPL
>> licenced projects into yours.
>
> I wouldn't say we chose it. We were told by legal that cc didn't work, so we spent a lot of time evolving the odbl (originally started by cc folks) and the CTs. It might look from that side of the planet that it was a hand of god type decision, but that's not the case. It's been multiple years of work around every possible solution.
>
> Also, your frame of reference is with OSM up and running and having these kinds of relationships. When I started OSM we had no data at all and nobody wanted to give us data under any license, let alone cc. So those of us who climbed the mountain to get those people to give us data see asking people to switch (such as ordnance survey for example) as a far smaller problem.

The difference now is the licensing debate has turned away many of the
most enthusiastic contributors in Australia. It's now no longer just a
technical or legal issue, but also one of community management.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exit,_Voice,_and_Loyalty seems quite
relevant as people are choosing to leave the community having seen
their voices ignored. Arguably this is worse than how you started with
organisations not giving you data, since it's people that change
organisations.

James Andrewartha



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