<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 3 July 2013 08:52, Steve Bennett <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:stevagewp@gmail.com" target="_blank">stevagewp@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">


<br>
Also a quick stat for you. 165,000 highways in Australia have a<br>
surface tag. 718,000 don't.<br>
<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Surprising stat.  Especially considering paved is considered the default. <br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">


it's no more burdensome<br>
to show all of [unsealed, unpaved, gravel, dirt] as a dashed line<br>
rather than just, say, unpaved.<br></blockquote><div><br><br><div><div><div><div><div><div><div>I really like multi-level tags.<br><br></div></div>natural=water<br></div>water=lake<br><br></div>surface=unpaved<br>unpaved=gravel<br>

<br></div><div>surface=paved<br>paved=asphalt<br><br></div></div>It
 makes it easy for people two write simple parsers without enumerating 
the options, but people who are want to parse the details to do so.<br><br></div>There are a number of instances when OSM uses this type of multi-level tagging scheme, but it lacks any form of consistency.<br><br>Ian</div>

</div><br></div></div>