<div dir="ltr">Yeah I did a bit more research afterwards to double check, including going and getting gps more gps traces and the current (Bing) imagery appears to be dead on. I also checked it with some centre lines from another data source (Not importing just to check the imagery) and they also verified that the Bing imagery is correct.<div>

<br></div><div style>Thanks for the feedback! I hadn't thought about the atmospheric interference. </div><div style><br></div><div style>Cheers,</div><div style>ingalls</div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">

On Wed, Jan 2, 2013 at 3:59 PM, Andrew Buck <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:andrew.r.buck@gmail.com" target="_blank">andrew.r.buck@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

Hi,<br>
<br>
I am not from the area, but I did want to post my 2 cents about this<br>
issue.  Your idea of how the offset got started sounds correct.  I<br>
would caution you though that GPS traces can be offset, too, due to<br>
atmospheric effects.  To really get a good trace with no offset you<br>
need to do a few traces on different days of the same road (or path is<br>
better since it is narrow) and through an area with few buildings<br>
around as these can cause offsets, too.<br>
<br>
Other than those issues, if you trust your traces then I see no reason<br>
not to fix the offset, but as I said make sure your traces are good<br>
first.<br>
<br>
-AndrewBuck<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div>