[Talk-GB] 'historic' county boundaries added to the database

Dave F davefoxfac63 at btinternet.com
Sun Aug 26 22:49:32 UTC 2018


Hi

To repeat, They do exist, but only as a record of old data, not current. 
just as there's a record of Humberside & Avon. That they don't get 
altered is irrelevant.

I disagree about their legality.

DaveF

On 26/08/2018 23:01, Adam Snape wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Both Colin and Dave have repeated the implication that the traditional 
> counties don't exist. It's very much arguable I guess, certainly 
> successive governments have made clear that they recognised the 
> continued existence of the traditional counties, and that 
> administrative changes neither legally abolished nor altered these 
> counties.
>
> On Sun, 26 Aug 2018, 22:01 Colin Smale, <colin.smale at xs4all.nl 
> <mailto:colin.smale at xs4all.nl>> wrote:
>
>     Except that the "ceremonial counties" actually do exist, and serve
>     a function. They are formally called "Lieutenancy Areas" and
>     represent the jurisdiction of the Lord Lieutenant as direct
>     representative of the monarchy. Their boundaries are maintained by
>     a different legal process to the admin areas, and on occasions can
>     diverge for a limited period until they catch up with changes to
>     admin boundaries. And then there is the Stockton-on-Tees
>     anomaly...the borough is divided between the ceremonial counties
>     of Durham and North Yorkshire.
>
>
> Thanks Colin,
>
> Yes, I was aware of how the ceremonial counties are defined. I think 
> if we're truly honest with ourselves we don't really map them because 
> lord lieutenancies (as wonderfully arcane and obscure as they are) are 
> of any real importance, but because they provide a vaguely sensible 
> and recognisable set of geographic areas that we can call counties. 
> Certainly if administrative importance were genuinely to be our 
> criteria for mapping we would be mapping all kinds of things prior to 
> lord lieutenancies.
>
> In practical terms lords lieutenant are historic, honorary crown 
> appointments and little more. If we actually believed this was 
> justification for mapping we could use the same arguments for mapping 
> the areas over which the royal duchies of Lancaster and Cornwall 
> perform various honorary and historic functions (such as appointing 
> the ever-so-important-in-the-present-day lords lieutenant) and 
> exercise special rights. Incidentally their legally-defined and extant 
> boundaries are the historic/traditional boundaries of the counties of 
> Lancashire and Cornwall :)
>
> Kind regards,
>
> Adam
>
>
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