Thanks very much Richard. I had been sitting in my GIS class this morning thinking about the due announcement as the lecturer mentioned OS OpenSpace, and said OS is like the Canada and USA mapping agencies. More on my blog <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><a href="http://www.livingwithdragons.com/2010/03/teaching-neogeography">http://www.livingwithdragons.com/2010/03/teaching-neogeography</a><div>
<a href="http://www.livingwithdragons.com/2010/03/teaching-neogeography"></a><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 31 March 2010 13:36, Richard Fairhurst <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:richard@systemed.net">richard@systemed.net</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">Licence will be "without restrictions on use and re-use". Original<br>
proposal was CC-BY. </blockquote><div>Without restrictions? Does that mean no attribution, it sounds like PD. Or does it mean they haven't told us the exact license yet but it will be "nice"?</div><div><br>
</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
I'm sure there are a few other things we'd have liked to have seen<br>
(aerial imagery, for example) but on balance this is a great result IMO<br>
- and one that wouldn't have happened without OSM.</blockquote></div>Should we be importing anything to OSM? Or at least making comparison tools around this OS data to compare our coverage? If there is tracing to be done then it might make a great project of the week.</div>
<div><br>-- <br>Gregory<br><a href="mailto:osm@livingwithdragons.com">osm@livingwithdragons.com</a><br><a href="http://www.livingwithdragons.com">http://www.livingwithdragons.com</a><br>
</div>