<div dir="ltr">Hello,<div><br></div><div>I would be happy to help in anyway and have previously had a conversation with Chris at NLS regarding helping georeference some of their maps.</div><div><br></div><div>I had been looking into creating my own historical version of OSM for a local personal project, when I looked a few weeks ago Open Historical Map was down and was never very usable before that. It sounds like from the WIKI things maybe starting to happen, date slider planned, etc.</div>
<div><br></div><div><div class="gmail_extra">regards,<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Steven<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sat, May 10, 2014 at 10:04 PM, Rob Nickerson <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:rob.j.nickerson@gmail.com" target="_blank">rob.j.nickerson@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="ltr"><div><div>Hi All, Historic Map folks,<br><br></div>I have now heard from Chris at National Library of Scotland (NLS). He is very supportive* of the idea of using something similar to the NYPL Building Inspector software and website for digitizing some of NLS's historic maps. As NYPL have made all their software Open Source, it should be relatively easy to roll this out with NLS's (or other) maps.<br>

<br></div>Who's interested in getting involved? You lot set the pace of this :-D<br><br>Regards,<br>Rob<br><div><div class="gmail_extra"><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">* NLS would be able to supply the scanned and geo-rectified maps. As with everyone else their ability to do any more is limited by their level of funding. This should not be a problem as we can self host the website.<br>

</div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><br></div></div></div></div></blockquote></div>
</div></div></div>