<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Dec 16, 2009 at 5:46 PM, michael lohr <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:micha.lohr@web.de">micha.lohr@web.de</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
Am 16.12.2009 12:18, schrieb Harshad RJ:<br>
<div class="im">><br>
> The Relation approach seems to be the new way of doing things, but<br>
> from what I could gather there isn't a complete consensus on it.<br>
</div>i wasn't aware of that. link?<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I can't find any now, so I will withdraw that statement.</div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
i disagree. working with relations is a lot easier for the editor (might<br>
not be true in our case though, cause the overlapping lines are there<br>
already and we would have to remove them). draw just one line, add it to<br>
the appropriate realtion with one click.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The problem is that it introduces one more level of hierarchy : nodes, ways & relations. And now the ways have to be created intelligently by finding out which part of the border is shared with other districts, states, or national borders.</div>
<div><br></div><div>In my opinion, this intelligence is best programmed once and automatically deduced rather than users having to do this for every admin border all over the world.</div><div><br></div><div>Anyway, this is just my opinion. If OSM as a community is moving in this direction, I either need to raise this issue with the whole OSM community or accept the prevalent custom. For sheer lack of time I will choose the latter :)</div>
<div><br></div><div><br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<br>
besides, the mapping should represent the situation on the ground as<br>
exactly as possible. in case of borders: there's not 5 borders there,<br>
just one. but the meaning of this one border depends on the context<br>
you're viewing it in. that's much better represented by one line and a<br>
couple of relations.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Well, it is just a matter of abstraction. Note that, one level of hierarchy already exists: nodes & ways. The nodes can be shared between borders and the ways are defined for each admin area. By introducing relations, we are just moving the problem one level up: the ways are shared and relations are defined for each admin area.</div>
<div><br></div><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">><br>
> In the short term, if I understand correctly, the only hitch with the<br>
> current approach is that borders will overlap.<br>
</div>that's a big hitch in my opinion. it might not be visible if rendered<br>
and you configure the renderer properly. but it will produce a lot of<br>
duplicate (and therefore useless) lines. just consider a a district on a<br>
national border. you'd have 6 lines on top of each other country a+b,<br>
state a+b, district a+b.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>Err.. what I am proposing is that this can and should be handled programatically in the renderer. And in fact, some logic for this would already exists in there somewhere.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Take for example, two areas that touch each other (say a park and a university campus). The renderer is able to handle that by drawing a single border between the two, ain't it? We don't create a way between the park and the university and then create two relations for them. The renderer manages it for us!</div>
<div><br></div><div>Btw, I don't claim to know my stuff very well. And I am starved for time. So, I will just rest my case here.</div><div><br></div><div>cheers,</div></div>-- <br>Harshad RJ<br><a href="http://hrj.wikidot.com">http://hrj.wikidot.com</a><br>