<div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Oct 29, 2010 at 7:47 AM, Richard Weait <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:richard@weait.com">richard@weait.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<div class="im">On Thu, Oct 28, 2010 at 10:07 PM, Ian Dees <<a href="mailto:ian.dees@gmail.com">ian.dees@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
> Hi everyone,<br>
> At the Google Summer of Code mentors summit this past weekend Google asked<br>
> us (the organizations that participated in Summer of Code) to also<br>
> participate in the Google Code-In project. The Code-In project is similar to<br>
> the Summer of Code but for 13-18 year olds. The tasks are meant to be much<br>
> smaller: the students are supposed to sign up for one task at a time, they<br>
> get $100 for every 3 tasks they complete (up to $500).<br>
> I talked a bit with Carol (the Google woman running the project) who liked<br>
> me suggestion for putting up a bunch of mapping-related projects. For<br>
> example, a project could be "map 100 restaurants in your area" or "map all<br>
> stores in mall X".<br>
<br>
</div>I'm not in favour of this idea.  Mapping for pay will encourage gaming<br>
the system for money and ripping data from other sources.  It will<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I'm also worried about ripping data from other sources, but I don't know what you mean by "gaming the system". Anyone can make inflammatory edits but it currently happens very infrequently. Why do you think adding money to the mix would change that situation?</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
also create a group of mappers who will stop when the money runs out<br>
and potentially resentment among the mappers who have mapped thousands<br>
of restaurants for the love of mapping or the love of their town.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>The goal behind Code-In is to expose younger students to open source. Even if exposing kids to OpenStreetMap involves rewarding them somehow, they have at least participated and (hopefully) assisted the community. Perhaps they will join the league of people who do this for fun after getting rewarded for the initial investment of learning what OSM is and how to edit properly.</div>
<div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
<br>
If there are bite-sized code contributions, let's have a look at that.<br>
 GSoC already has retention issues in the larger projects.  Not every<br>
GSoC student continues with their project after the summer period.  I<br>
see this as a larger problem in a project with a lower initial barrier<br>
to entry.<br><br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think you'll already have a hard time getting GSoC participants to stay with any of their projects: they're students with busy lives. GSoC is their summer job and when its over they have to start classes and do homework. They leave with cash and some coding experience and the mentoring organization steps away with some fresh code and some cash as well. I think expecting students of any caliber to stick with their projects after getting rewarded is a pretty high bar to reach for.</div>
</div>