Not sure it is necessary to suggest all nonhackers and non humanitarians on this list are couch potatoes to further the argument.<div><br></div><div>Osm is a place where imports happen, we have rules to stick to, we want to have educated discussions about those rules.</div><div><br></div><div><span></span>I am tired of import bashing as an unproductive tangent on almost all import related discussions.<br><br>On Friday, April 3, 2015, Frederik Ramm <<a href="mailto:frederik@remote.org">frederik@remote.org</a>> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Hi,<br>
<br>
On 04/03/2015 02:41 AM, stevea wrote:<br>
> Erring on the side of "high ground" safety might be<br>
> a good place to plant an initial flag, but if it's location is wrong and<br>
> we need to move it to a more accurate place, we must do so.<br>
<br>
Frankly - no. OSM does not depend on the inclusion of third party data<br>
sources for its quality. Taking a "high ground safety" approach with<br>
regards to third-party rights in data might cut us off from some third<br>
party data sources but then re-publishing these third party sources in<br>
OSM clothes doesn't do us much good anyway.<br>
<br>
If an individual is desperate to use a third party data source, let them<br>
do the due diligence on the legality of the source, but it certainly<br>
isn't "us" who must move our flag to make it (even) easier to swamp us<br>
with (often low quality) third-party data.<br>
<br>
> It sounds like it is getting a bit shrill.  I'll say it again:  I wish<br>
> light, not heat.<br>
<br>
I would be absolutely thrilled if more people, especially more<br>
Americans, would stop thinking about what data they could take and add<br>
to OSM, and instead grab a GPS, or their car, or their boots, or<br>
bicycle, or mobile phone, or all of that, and simply map stuff.<br>
<br>
It seems to me that in the USA, what people think about OSM is one of<br>
these two:<br>
<br>
(a) A project for hackers and couch potatoes who trawl their county web<br>
pages and other sources to look for stuff they could "upload" to OSM<br>
(because it's such a big country and nobody could possibly, yadda yadda<br>
yadda)<br>
<br>
(b) A project for people who roll up their sleeves, travel to places of<br>
humanitarian crises, and help those in need by creating maps where the<br>
government hasn't done their job well.<br>
<br>
The idea that you could also roll up your sleeves and map your own<br>
backyeard, village, town, or city quarter, instead of copying from<br>
official bicycle route publications, official railway brochures, or<br>
stuff that the administration has done, seems to occur to very few<br>
people, and others will say: "OpenStreetMap is cool, but I don't think<br>
that actually going out and doing a survey is a good use of my time".<br>
<br>
I'm really sad that time and time again we have to fight about whether<br>
or not a specific source is permitted to be used in OSM, when we could<br>
just collect the facts ourselves and therefore be completely free of any<br>
legal implications (and also free of errors that others may have made).<br>
<br>
Bye<br>
Frederik<br>
<br>
--<br>
Frederik Ramm  ##  eMail <a href="javascript:;" onclick="_e(event, 'cvml', 'frederik@remote.org')">frederik@remote.org</a>  ##  N49°00'09" E008°23'33"<br>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Talk-us mailing list<br>
<a href="javascript:;" onclick="_e(event, 'cvml', 'Talk-us@openstreetmap.org')">Talk-us@openstreetmap.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-us" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-us</a><br>
</blockquote></div>