[OSM-talk] question for folks working on routing engines

john at jfeldredge.com john at jfeldredge.com
Fri Apr 15 18:14:59 BST 2011


You are assuming that all dirt roads will be well-maintained, and that all dirt roads are in dry regions.  Both assumptions are false.  Most of the eastern half of the USA, and the Pacific Northwest of the USA, get plenty of rainfall, and even the dryer regions get some rainfall, some of it heavy enough to erode an unpaved roadway.

-------Original Email-------
Subject :Re: [OSM-talk] question for folks working on routing engines
From  :mailto:nroets at gmail.com
Date  :Fri Apr 15 09:53:24 America/Chicago 2011


Hello Richard,

Gosmore looks at maxspeed and tracktype.

I did not use surface, because I am under the impression that it is
possible to drive fast on properly maintained dirt roads in dryer
regions.

Regards,
Nic

On Fri, Apr 15, 2011 at 4:36 PM, Richard Welty <rwelty at averillpark.net> wrote:
> this occurred to me while surveying speed limits in a somewhat rural
> part of the US.
>
> are any of the routing engines looking at the surface tag as part of
> their decision making?
>
> i ask this because in NY, the default speed limit in rural areas is 55
> on all roads. there are numerous unpaved roads (dirt, gravel) which
> do not have posted speed limits, but where driving at 55 is not
> reasonable unless you're a rally driver and the road is closed.
>
> i want to tag these accurately, and am doing so, but i should think
> that the routing engines ought to avoid, when possible, this combination
> or others like it:
>
> highway=unclassified
> name=Mead Road
> maxspeed=55 mph
> surface=dirt
>
> richard
>
>
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>

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John F. Eldredge -- john at jfeldredge.com
"Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better than not to think at all." -- Hypatia of Alexandria


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