On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 8:51 PM, David Earl <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:david@frankieandshadow.com">david@frankieandshadow.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
But you are overlooking Database Copyright. It's not the individual<br>
facts, but the way in which they are collated as a collection that is<br>
copyrightable. So if you are taking the information off their map, you<br>
are, in effect, ripping off their database.</blockquote><div><br><br>Are you talking about the sui generis rights for databases?<br><br>Database Copyright (with capital D and C) is not very precise, especially not combined with phrases like "ripping off".<br>
<br> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">And yes, they do claim copyright over grid references, when they are<br>
derived from their maps. See the letter they sent to licensees about<br>
superimposing items geolocated from OS maps on top of Google maps recently.</blockquote><div><br>As far as I understood, they based this on contract law, not a license? Besides, trying to overstate your rights does not imply that you are right.<br>
<br> - Gustav <br></div></div><br>