<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; "><br><div><div>On 19 Feb 2011, at 18:27, Dave F. wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">
<div bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    On 19/02/2011 17:30, Richard Mann wrote:
    <blockquote cite="mid:AANLkTimD1Qwqkyc1EBLSLzKq3Ouby_yMesKJQu3mQoSu@mail.gmail.com" type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">There's probably some good reason, but why isn't there a link from
<a href="http://osm.org">osm.org</a> to report a bug?
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    Could it be because not many people use it?<br>
    <br>
    I still don't understand why, in a collaborative project, that
    osmbugs is used as a record to get other people to amend missing
    items <br>
    <br>
    "Feel free to put the modifications you would like to see on <a href="http://www.openstreetmap.org/">OpenStreetMap</a> on the map."<br>
    <br>
    That is from the front page. To me, it goes against the way OSM is
    meant to work; if you want to see modifications to OSM then do it
    yourselves.<br>
    <br>
    Much more useful is the likes of Keepright which can flag up fixme
    tags.<br></div></blockquote></div><div><br></div>If you are a someone who isn't great technically, then something like osm bugs is a great thing as it allows you to contribute.<div><br></div><div>Also if you are an experience mapper and know something needs checked, it can be used as a todo list, that someone else might need to get to before you.<br><div><br></div><div>Shaun</div><div><br></div></div></body></html>