<div dir="ltr">How are historical place names from annexed countries regarded? Or put in another way; when does a name no longer exist?<br><br><div>In the case on Finland, which lost Karelia to Russia in the 1950s, hundreds of place names were translated and are now officially Russian, with the Finnish population gone. </div>

<div>Former place names could nevertheless be of historical value (e.g. to see the geographical extent of the language), as physical historical features are. </div><div><br></div><div>The question is, does a name disappear when it is no longer used? Larger cities are still called by their Finnish names in a Finnish context, so would towns and villages be any different? Or when they are deserted?<br>

</div><br><div>There is also the unignorable issue of geopolitics, as there are still tensions between the countries. </div><div>There is no shortage of geographical naming disputes (<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Geographical_naming_disputes" target="_blank">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Geographical_naming_disputes</a>), </div>

<div>and wikipedians themselves had a row over geographical names. (<a href="http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/02/05/China_Japan_Wikipedia_War_Senkaku_Diaoyu?page=full" target="_blank">http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2013/02/05/China_Japan_Wikipedia_War_Senkaku_Diaoyu?page=full</a>)</div>

<div>I can imagine how the naming could be seen having a political agenda. </div><div><br></div><div>For what it's worth, my agenda is only historical, although I can't shrug off my national bias.<br></div><div>Before I go and add name:fi= place-names, I'd like to hear what the community thinks of this.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Chris Helenius</div></div>