<html><head></head><body>Interesting, I didn't know such patrolling took place at a country scale in OSM. Have you revert/re-map stats? <br>
<br>
However with your point 1)you have an idea. <br>
How about a service rendering the area affected by an edit before 'commit'?<br>
This preview could be the place for an additional warning about the the live DB. <br>
Yves <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">Le 17 mars 2017 16:50:53 GMT+01:00, Tomas Straupis <tomasstraupis@gmail.com> a √©crit :<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">
<pre class="k9mail">Let's get on the higher level first.<br />There are two ways of doing it from the process perspective:<br /><br />1) EDIT->TEST->COMMIT<br />2) EDIT->COMMIT->TEST<br /><br />The first one gives higher quality but also discourages edits and<br />maybe even prohibits edits in areas with no/few "checkers".<br /><br />So obviously the way to go for OSM is option 2.<br /><br />Now here what has to be done is an appropriate testing mechanism.<br />There are some functionality already done (like the one in Belgium),<br />but the problem is that everybody sees ALL last changes, there is no<br />way to SHARE the work of checking and you never know if somebody has<br />already checked the changeset.<br /><br />What we are doing in Lithuania for the last 5 years or so is we have a<br />patrolling mechanism similar to wikipedia. That is all changesets in<br />the region (in our case in Lithuania) are filtered out and placed into<br />"check list". If the editor is known good mapper - his/her edits are<br />"approved" automatically. Otherwise somebody with a status of "known"<br />mapper should approve it. But when the changeset is approved - it does<br />not show up for other "approvers". This way we avoid double work. So<br />in practice this allows us to review only "suspicious" changes and in<br />5 year of experience this worked out perfectly - all bad/suspicious<br />changes have been noticed in a matter of hours! (for example all<br />suspicious <a href="http://crap.me">crap.me</a> edits can be reverted promptly)<br /><br />So my suggestion is to add some global "patrolling" mechanism with<br />division to regions (maybe by countries, maybe by country regions for<br />large countries). So if there are people interested in some region,<br />they will review the changesets, if there is nobody interested -<br />nobody will review, but changes will be in database anyway - so no<br />preventing of edits.<br /><br />P.S. Second step would be more automated checks but that is a separate<br />topic and should only go after this first one is solved/implemented.<br /></pre></blockquote></div></body></html>