<html><head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /></head><body style='font-size: 10pt; font-family: Verdana,Geneva,sans-serif'>
<p>Java and Javascript have only those four letters in common. They are completely unconnected in all other respects.</p>
<div> </div>
<p><br /></p>
<p>On 2018-02-17 19:54, john whelan wrote:</p>
<blockquote type="cite" style="padding: 0 0.4em; border-left: #1010ff 2px solid; margin: 0"><!-- html ignored --><!-- head ignored --><!-- meta ignored -->
<div dir="ltr">
<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family: verdana,sans-serif; font-size: small;">JAVA script is used by web sites.  It does not require JAVA to be installed.<br /><br /></div>
<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family: verdana,sans-serif; font-size: small;">JAVA itself may or may not be a security risk the issue is that it has been declared one by the US government in the past and that means many organisations will not permit it to be installed.<br /><br /></div>
<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family: verdana,sans-serif; font-size: small;">Relevant because it is a constraint and has an impact.<br /><br /></div>
<div class="gmail_default" style="font-family: verdana,sans-serif; font-size: small;">Cheerio John</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_extra"><br />
<div class="gmail_quote">On 17 February 2018 at 13:48, Nicolás Alvarez <span><<a href="mailto:nicolas.alvarez@gmail.com">nicolas.alvarez@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br />
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0 0 0 .8ex; border-left: 1px #ccc solid; padding-left: 1ex;">Curiously enough those same organizations and governments then run<br /> Java web apps on their servers. Java isn't a security risk, Java<br /> applets running inside a browser are the problem. And that's blocked<br /> by browsers nowadays.<br /> <br /> I don't understand why this is relevant to the original discussion though...<br /> <span class="HOEnZb"><span style="color: #888888;"><br /> --<br /> Nicolás<br /> </span></span>
<div class="HOEnZb">
<div class="h5"><br /> 2018-02-17 15:27 GMT-03:00 john whelan <<a href="mailto:jwhelan0112@gmail.com">jwhelan0112@gmail.com</a>>:<br /> > The JAVA issue comes up as many use work machines and since JAVA has been<br /> > identified by the US government as a security risk some time ago many<br /> > organisations do not permit it's installation on their equipment.<br /> ><br /> > Which means in simple terms you can't use the building_tool plugin when<br /> > mapping buildings and with new mappers that hurts data quality.<br /> ><br /> > Cheerio John<br /> ><br /> > On 17 Feb 2018 1:18 pm, "Mike N" <<a href="mailto:niceman@att.net">niceman@att.net</a>> wrote:<br /> >><br /> >> On 2/17/2018 11:01 AM, James wrote:<br /> >>><br /> >>> except it wouldnt be multiplatform and only run on windows 🤢🤮. Java is<br /> >>> a better alternative as it's a popular language and is multiplatform. C/c++<br /> >>> is a bit more complicated and not everyone can contribute.<br /> >><br /> >><br /> >> That's no longer true - .Net is open source and generates multiplatform<br /> >> code and the C# language has an open source reference.<br /> >><br /> >>  That being said, Java is quite suitable for JOSM, and the security issues<br /> >> would rarely if ever surface in JOSM.  The big question is how well does<br /> >> JOSM serve as an OSM editor?   Quite well by a number of indicators.</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
<br />
<div class="pre" style="margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: monospace">_______________________________________________<br /> talk mailing list<br /> <a href="mailto:talk@openstreetmap.org">talk@openstreetmap.org</a><br /> <a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk</a></div>
</blockquote>
</body></html>