<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">JAVA started as a SUN product.  It is now an Oracle product.  I spent a number of years working with Oracle on license for their databases.  A number of sales people's statements about their licensing were dubious and inconsistent so I'll admit I am slightly bias.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">Having said that if we look at the requirements then we'd like the ability to run on UNIX and Windows.  Apple are their own world and yes it can be run but Apple don't especially like you running it.<br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br>We'd like to be able to run the software on corporate machines.  These days many companies follow the US government's lead and say JAVA is too much of a security risk to be allowed to install it.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">We have a lot of existing code and programmers who know JAVA.  We have a lot of existing JOSM users which means lots of tutorials and documentation.  Any changes to the interface will be expensive in people time.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">Pure JAVA is interpreted, the translation for lay people is it needs a more powerful computer to do the same work in the same time.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">I have no instant solutions but I do think sometimes we should try to think things through in advance.  Perhaps the biggest concern is a major security hole opens up and Oracle will not repair it.  JAVA is not known to be highly secure at the best of times.  If this happens what is the impact?<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">It can be controlled to some extent in Windows by running in a separate user account but that too complicated for many of our users to configure.  Do we have any responsibility to our mappers to keep their machines safe?<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">Dunno which is why its worth raising the matter.<br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small"><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">Cheerio John<br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 22 April 2018 at 15:34, Jan Martinec <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:jan@martinec.name" target="_blank">jan@martinec.name</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div dir="auto">End of Java _8_, not all Java. Java 9 is already out, this is just a version upgrade. So far, I have used JOSM on Java 6, Java 7, Java 8 and Java 9 - this only means that ancient installations of JOSM will only work with an older version of JOSM. (It's still possible to run JOSM build 10526 on Java 7. Source: having done just that, yesterday).<div dir="auto"><br></div><div dir="auto">No action required w/r/t JOSM, relax.</div><div dir="auto">Cheers,</div><div dir="auto">Jan "Piskvor" Martinec </div></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr">Dne ne 22. 4. 2018 21:05 uživatel john whelan <<a href="mailto:jwhelan0112@gmail.com" target="_blank">jwhelan0112@gmail.com</a>> napsal:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div><div class="h5"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small"><a href="http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/eol-135779.html" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.oracle.com/<wbr>technetwork/java/eol-135779.<wbr>html</a><br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">It needs to be translated into English.  For example Long Term Support means no new versions per three years.  <br><br>"
Basically, free Java 8 updates for commercial customers, such as game 
developers, will cease in January 2019. After that date commercial 
customers must have a licence to continue to receive the updates.<br>
<br>
Free Java 8 updates for non-commercial uses, such as your home PC, will continue until the end of 2020.<br>
<br>
As of last September Oracle have moved to a LTS (Long Term Support) 
model for Java with new LTS versions released every 3 years - the 
current Java 8 was released Sept 2017 so December 2020 will be the end 
of a three year LTS cycle.

"<br><br></div><div class="gmail_default" style="font-family:verdana,sans-serif;font-size:small">Cheerio John<br></div></div><div class="gmail_extra"><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 22 April 2018 at 14:40, Mateusz Konieczny <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:matkoniecz@gmail.com" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">matkoniecz@gmail.com</a>></span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><span>On Sun, 22 Apr 2018 14:26:13 -0400<br>
john whelan <<a href="mailto:jwhelan0112@gmail.com" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">jwhelan0112@gmail.com</a>> wrote:<br>
<br>
> Someone who worked at Oracle has mentioned Oracle would like to be<br>
> out of JAVA by 2020 and that is the date for individual free licenses<br>
> to expire.<br>
<br>
</span>Source?<br>
</blockquote></div><br></div></div></div>
______________________________<wbr>_________________<br>
talk mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:talk@openstreetmap.org" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">talk@openstreetmap.org</a><br>
<a href="https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk" rel="noreferrer noreferrer" target="_blank">https://lists.openstreetmap.<wbr>org/listinfo/talk</a><br>
</blockquote></div>
</blockquote></div><br></div>