[HOT] Request for help/guidance on a project to test diarrheal disease interventions in Kendua Sub-District, Bangladesh.

Stacey Maples stacemaples at stanford.edu
Fri Jan 30 21:36:35 UTC 2015


All, 

I'm working with a faculty member studying the efficacy of mobile app based interventions, who needs detailed street and building footprints for his pilot. He is working in the Kendua sub-district of Bangladesh, initially, and needs data for health workers to use to identify cholera patients homes/home village, pharmacies, etc... I've pasted his abstract, below. If he finds efficacy, he will likely expand the project to other sub-districts. We are wondering several things: 

First, what is the process to have a project added to the Task Manager? 

Second, do you happen to currently have mappers in this area who could work on this? 

Finally, we may be able to obtain gps traces from food delivery drivers to upload to OSM. It would be great to have a training for them if there are mappers in the area, or in Dhaka who would be willing to travel. Wondering who to contact about the possibility of that (I know bulk uploads are frowned upon unless coordinated with OSM). 

Thanks in advance for your time, I've pasted the abstract for the project, below my signature. 


In F,L&T, 
Stace Maples 
Geospatial Manager 
Stanford Geospatial Center 
@mapninja 
staceymaples at G + 
Get GeoHelp: https://gis.stanford.edu/ 
"I have a map of the United States... actual size. 
It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile." 
I spent last summer folding it." 
-Steven Wright- 


Leveraging mobile technology to improve clinical outcomes and scientific research of the second leading cause of childhood death: diarrheal disease 

Abstract 
Diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of death among children under 5 years of age globally. We are specifically interested in the diarrheal disease cholera because of the devastating impact the disease has on at-risk populations and the emerging opportunities to leverage mobile technology to overcome fundamental clinical, epidemiologic, and scientific challenges. Despite effective treatments and advances in provider education, cholera case fatality rates remain unacceptably high. Conventional methods have been unable to overcome barriers to provide patients timely access to care in resource-poor settings. This is especially true early in outbreaks because response teams are slow to mobilize and cholera can infect, transmit and kill in less than 20 hours. Our research challenge is to take an unconventional approach to develop a new method using mobile technology to identify outbreak clusters early, improve care, and advance our basic understanding of the disease. The specific aims of this project are to (i) develop mobile technology for clinical decision support and real-time epidemiology, (ii) test the mobile-technology and determine microbial correlates to disease progression at the hospital level, and (iii) test the mobile-technology and determine microbial correlates to disease progression at the community level. We chose to develop and test this strategy in partnership with the Ministry of Health of Bangladesh at a site with high cholera morbidity and relatively high mortality. We anticipate this NIH funded research will provide an exciting cross-departmental forum for collaboration and training, as well as a pathway to discovery that will directly benefit populations inflicted with diseases like cholera. 

Eric Jorge Nelson, MD PhD 
Pediatric Global Health Physician Scientist Instructor, 
Division of Infectious Diseases Department of Pediatrics, 
Stanford University School of Medicine 
Email: eric.nelson.mdphd at gmail.com 
Telephone: (857)-492-2174 
Address: Beckman B241, School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305-5323 





In F,L&T, 
Stace Maples 
Geospatial Manager 
Stanford Geospatial Center 
@mapninja 
staceymaples at G+ 

Get GeoHelp: https://gis.stanford.edu/ 

"I have a map of the United States... actual size. 
It says, "Scale: 1 mile = 1 mile." 
I spent last summer folding it." 
-Steven Wright- 
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/hot/attachments/20150130/1e4cc871/attachment.html>


More information about the HOT mailing list