[Tagging] mast / tower / communication_tower (again)

Graeme Fitzpatrick graemefitz1 at gmail.com
Sun Sep 30 00:45:07 UTC 2018


On Sun, 30 Sep 2018 at 00:54, SelfishSeahorse <selfishseahorse at gmail.com>
wrote:

>
> On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 at 00:29, Michael Booth <boothym at gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I fail to understand the difference between a
> man_made=communications_tower and man_made=tower +
> tower:type=communication. Aren't all towers far visible landmarks?
> When is a tower huge? The wiki page also says that 'another indication
> is, that a man_made=communications_tower has stairs and a lift inside,
> whereas as man_made=tower, tower:type=communication has to be climbed
> on the outside.' However this is contradictory with the definition of
> man_made=tower: 'a tower is accessible and provides platforms, whereas
> a mast only offers ladder steps to climb it.'
>
> It might be better to discourage man_made=communications_tower and tag
> them man_made=tower + tower:type=communication + height=*.
>
> > I'd like to retag the structures near me to something more suitable -
> however the wiki pages aren't very clear in distinguishing between the
> various constructions and sizes for masts and towers.
>
> I'm not an expert on this, but i think the distinction steps/lift
> inside (= tower) vs latter outside (= mast) makes sense.
>

Agree with you both that the definitions are contradictory :-(
https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Tag:man_made%3Dmast says that

"In structural engineering, *mast* is a vertical structure, supported by
external guys and anchors.

This is the only existing definite feature that could be used to
differentiate masts and towers."

but then shows an photo example of a "mast" with no guys.


> 1. https://binged.it/2xILZO9
> > 2. https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2361955
> > 3. https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2337468
> > 4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charwelton_BT_Tower
> > 5. https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2053885
> > 6. https://binged.it/2xTxcQK
> > 7. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tour_hertzienne_de_Villeneuve-d%27Ascq
> > 8. https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/2162874
>
> Why aren't 2, 3, 5, 6 and 8 masts and 4 and 7 towers? Because the
> structure itself is an antenna?
>

Going by that definition, none of them are masts are they're not guyed? But
this:
https://www.google.com/maps/@-27.3092365,153.0188494,3a,26.8y,208.74h,113.98t/data=!3m7!1e1!3m5!1s5_tHVpvyp4DL3A_9vMPZYw!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3D5_tHVpvyp4DL3A_9vMPZYw%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D306.1943%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100!7i13312!8i6656
*is* a mast.


> By the way, i'm wondering if poles with mounted antennas like in the
> following image can also be called masts or if man_made=pole
> (undocumented, but 2 047 uses so far) would be better?
>

Possibly so, but by your own question "When is a tower huge?", when does a
pole become a mast / tower? :-)

Thanks

Graeme
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