[Tagging] Maxweight wiki page changes

Tobias Zwick osm at westnordost.de
Sat Jul 6 12:00:04 UTC 2019


>Unladen weight is used in European countries to apply only to goods
>vehicles, either 3.5t or 7.5t, and is tagged as hgv=no/destination.

Are you absolutely sure about this?

I am pretty sure myself that hgv are defined differently: as goods vehicles with a "gross vehicle weight rating" (gvwr), a.k.a. "gross vehicle mass" (gvm) or plainly said maximum laden weight above 3.5t

...  and also documented it this way on the Key:hgv page

Tobias

On July 6, 2019 1:38:34 PM GMT+02:00, Philip Barnes <phil at trigpoint.me.uk> wrote:
>
>
>On Saturday, 6 July 2019, Warin wrote:
>> On 06/07/19 19:46, Colin Smale wrote:
>> >
>> > On 2019-07-06 10:48, Warin wrote:
>> >
>> >> On 06/07/19 18:16, Colin Smale wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>> On 2019-07-06 05:03, Warin wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>     On 05/07/19 19:33, Mateusz Konieczny wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>         3 Jul 2019, 12:52 by osm at westnordost.de:
>> >>>
>> >>>             1.1 At the examples: for max empty weight, I propose
>the
>> >>>             key maxemptyweight. It suggests itself.
>> >>>
>> >>>         Added, with link back to this post
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>     Here that would be called "maximum Tare weight". In the UK? 
>> >>>
>> >>> Probably "maximum unladen weight." "Tare" does exist as a word,
>and 
>> >>> is frequently used in logistics (empty weight of containers etc)
>but 
>> >>> AFAIK not in the context of traffic regulations.
>> >>>
>> >>
>> >> Possibly not where you are.. but
>> >>
>> >> "registrable light motor vehicle means a motor vehicle that is 
>> >> registrable and has a tare mass that is not greater than 2,794 
>> >> kilograms."
>> >>
>> >> From
>https://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/#/view/regulation/2017/451/full
>> >>
>> >> And also in other traffic legislation in Australia...
>> >>
>> >> In the UK?
>> >>
>> >> "(h)the manner in which the tare weight of road vehicles, or of
>road 
>> >> vehicles of any particular class or description is to be
>determined. "
>> >> from https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1985/72
>> >>
>> >>
>> > That is not a traffic regulation, that's about metrology. And by
>the 
>> > way, I am speaking as a Brit, so native speaker and somewhat 
>> > conversant with the laws and legal system. As I said, the word
>"tare" 
>> > does exist, and is used in certain specific contexts. But in 
>> > connection with road vehicles, everybody in the UK speaks of
>Unladen 
>> > Weight.
>> >
>> > https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-weights-explained
>> >
>> 
>> Ok.
>> Here trucks have small signs on there side, they state the tare
>weight 
>> and gvw. I think these are used to confirm the vehicle is not
>overloaded 
>> when inspected (we have both mobile and stationary testing).
>> Also tare is used to specify the maximum tare weight of a trailer
>that 
>> inexperienced drivers can use, and that is a road regulation. It may 
>> also be used for other things.
>> A fairly common term here.
>> 
>> -------------
>> Further nit picking..
>> The "Unladen weight" is usually done without fuel but in all other
>ways 
>> ready for the road -i.e. includes spare tyre/s, tools, battery,
>coolant, 
>> oil etc etc. ???
>> I think some manufactures sales brochures quote figures without some
>of 
>> these to make it appear that they have greater load carrying
>capabilities.
>> Again this may vary from place to place around the world.
>> 
>> --------------------
>> I would be happy with "unladen weight" rather than "empty weight".
>> As for "maximum" .. I would use "limit" similar to the use of "speed 
>> limit". So it would become "unladen weight limit".
>> 
>> I don't think I have ever seen a sign limiting the unladen weight ..
>it 
>> is always a limit on the total weight that the structure is rated
>for.
>> So I don't think there is much point in discussing it? At least not
>from 
>> my limited knowledge.
>>
>Unladen weight is used in European countries to apply only to goods
>vehicles, either 3.5t or 7.5t, and is tagged as hgv=no/destination.
>
>It has nothing to do with structures, it is to prevent heavy goods
>vehicles taking short cuts through residential areas.
>
>It only apples to goods vehicles, as you need buses to have access.
>
>Phil (trigpoint)



More information about the Tagging mailing list