[Tagging] Milk Churn Stands

Philip Barnes phil at trigpoint.me.uk
Sun Jun 21 09:25:56 UTC 2020


On Sat, 2020-06-20 at 19:25 +0100, Paul Allen wrote:
> On Sat, 20 Jun 2020 at 19:08, Martin Koppenhoefer <
> dieterdreist at gmail.com> wrote:
> > 
> > > On 20. Jun 2020, at 14:44, Paul Allen <pla16021 at gmail.com> wrote:
> > 
> > > 
> > 
> > > They should probably have disused=yes or a disused lifecycle
> > 
> > > prefix (cue endless arguments about which) except in parts of the
> > world
> > 
> > > where they actually are still in use (if they are).
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > I think if any I would use disused=yes as they still remain
> > „operational“ I guess, although not actually used.
> 
> True of brick/concrete/stone.  For wooden ones that are decaying,
> abandoned=yes
> may be more appropriate.  I've not had chance to take a look myself
> yet (and
> won't be able to look until there's a vaccine) but sources I cannot
> use for
> mapping indicate that the one nearest to me, embedded in a bank, has
> had
> the bank reshaped to cover the top of it (only the side is visible). 
> Using
> abandoned=yes in such cases would seem appropriate.
> 
> > The disused:key=value style seems more appropriate for functions
> > (amenity etc.) than for physical descriptions (man_made).
> 
> That is how I interpret it, but others on this list have a different
> opinion.  However,
> I'd go with was:man_made=milk_churn_stand if it had been repurposed
> in some way that it merited a different main tag.  A foolish
> consistency
> is the hobgoblin of little minds, according to Ralph Waldo Emerson.
> 
> That leaves the question of the name.  For older British English
> speakers the
> containers are called milk churns, even though they are not for
> churning
> milk.  This may cause confusion to younger speakers of British
> English
> and those for whom English is a second language.  According to the
> Wikipedia article these are sometimes referred to as milk cans so
> maybe milk_can_stand would be better than milk_churn_stand.
> 
I can remember milk churns on these stands waiting for collection being
a common sight when I was growing up.
These days milk churns are a common period prop on preserved railway
stations.For example here at Arley 
https://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4458834
When children see these and ask what they are they will be told that
they are milk churns rather milk cans.
Phil (trigpoint)




> -- 
> Paul
> 
> 
> 
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