[HOT] HOT Digest, Vol 26, Issue 24

Robert Colombo Llimona robertcolombo at gmail.com
Wed Apr 11 21:23:58 BST 2012


Great explanation!One more thing to ad is the feeling that ESRI is counting with oSM and the feeling that many things Are changing in emergencies: croud or community Are on the grid for humanitarian action more than ever!

Enviat desde l'ipod de la Eva i en Robs. 


El 11/04/2012, a les 20:38, hot-request at openstreetmap.org va escriure:
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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Feedback from the Red Cross, UN people,    and Esri: YOU (OSM)
>      are GREAT!!! (Jean-Guilhem Cailton)
>   2. Activation working group (tim)
>   3. Re: Mali follow-up: OrbView-3 images of Anefis,
>      And?ramboukane and Aguelhok available (Jean-Guilhem Cailton)
>   4. Re: Feedback from the Red Cross, UN people,    and Esri: YOU
>      (OSM) are GREAT!!! (Mikel Maron)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 17:47:12 +0200
> From: Jean-Guilhem Cailton <jgc at arkemie.com>
> To: hot at openstreetmap.org
> Cc: OSM-talk <talk at openstreetmap.org>
> Subject: [HOT] Feedback from the Red Cross, UN people,    and Esri: YOU
>    (OSM) are GREAT!!!
> Message-ID: <4F85A780.7000403 at arkemie.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> Hi,
> 
> Last week, I was at the conference "GIS for the United Nations and the
> International Community", a conference organized by UNITAR's Operational
> Satellite Application Programme (UNOSAT) and Esri, April 3-5, 2012, at
> the World Meteorological Organization, in Geneva, Switzerland.
> 
> The main message I'd like to get back to each and everyone of you, from
> the almost unanimous feedback I received and witnessed while I was
> there, is that OpenStreetMap is rather well known and very much
> appreciated among the people who attended the conference. It is
> difficult to carry across the kind of recognition and gratefulness that
> I felt for the work of OSM volunteers, and no expression can be
> exaggerated to convey it. I am not saying that Ban Ki-moon knows about
> OSM as much as he probably knows about Google, for instance, but at
> least the UN people connected in some (possibly remote) way to GIS know
> about it, and some are really well aware of the strengths (and also of
> course of the weaknesses) of OSM.
> 
> Even in the panel that I attended in the first panel session,
> "Geographic Information in Postcrisis - Transition to Stability and
> Redevelopment", where OSM was not explicitly on the agenda, it came up
> in the knowledgeable and lively discussion that followed, with some
> strong opinions expressed about the "commercial" character of the
> licence (from the point of view of this mostly humanitarian audience),
> and the restrictions it implies, a topic that deserves more development
> and to which I'll come back later in another post.
> 
> The next day, I was a panelist in "Open Data and the Crowd:
> Collaborating for Action", a panel moderated by Ryan Lanclos, Esri,
> where I had been invited at the last minute to represent H.O.T. It was a
> really very interesting panel, with Lars Bromley, UNITAR/UNOSAT, Jihad
> Abdalla, Emergency Officer at UNICEF/EMOPS, Andrej Verity, UNOCHA, and
> Fr?d?ric Zanetta, IFRC. UNOSAT had made their own experiments about
> crowd-sourcing, and were well aware of its difficulties. I presented OSM
> in general, and in particular the remote mobilization for Haiti (with an
> extract of Tim Berners-Lee video at TED 2010) followed by field projects
> there, with the example of the STM_020 project in Saint Marc, Haiti,
> where I had just spent a month (I'll also come back to this later). I
> think, judging from later interventions, that I managed to get across
> the message that OSM is first of all a community (rather than a
> "crowd"). A similar point was also later expressed from the audience,
> with someone saying that organizations should "engage" with the "crowd",
> not "use" it. In his conclusion, Andrej Verity encouraged the audience
> "not to be afraid" to engage "the crowd".
> After this panel, my personal feeling was an exhilarating one that
> apparently everyone, from the panel and the interventions from the
> audience, had a desire to move forward, iteratively improving
> cooperation processes, and solving problems as they might arise.
> 
> In the next panel that I attended, of particular interest was the
> presentation by Ren? Saameli, of the ICRC, of the mapping of Walikale,
> DR Congo, to support the Red Cross water supply project there, jointly
> by remote OSM volunteers, who digitized the satellite image acquired by
> the Red Cross, by local Red Cross representative and correspondents, who
> collected field information, like names of streets and suburbs or points
> of interest, on Walking Papers (with no need for GPS units - which would
> be too costly if this process is to be repeated on a large scale), and
> remote OSM volunteers again, who entered WP info into the database, to
> produce a complete and accurate map of the town. Analyzes, such as
> population repartition estimation based on digitized buildings, could
> then also be conducted. The ICRC was so pleased by this project, as well
> as previous joint work with OSM (like for mapping Osh in Kirghiztan
> during the 2010 troubles there) that he declared that they are preparing
> a Memorandum of Understanding with HOT, and envision the possibility to
> have volunteers who would be both "Red Cross" and "HOT", as the Red
> Cross and OSM are both mainly volunteers movements. Big credit goes to
> Fr?d?ric Bonifas for building this trust relationship over the years.
> Here is an interview about this collaborative mapping:
> http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/interview/2012/mapping-interview-2012-04-05.htm
> Getting closer to the Red Cross and its millions of volunteers
> worldwide, for those interested, could be a way to bridge the missing
> link between the potential of OSM tools and the (mostly unmapped and
> unconnected) local communities of the developing world, where they could
> be really useful to make a difference.
> And this could also be a popularity boost for OSM, by making lay people
> aware of the link between maps and humanitarian action.
> Like Ren? said off the record, it could be a reply from "humanitarians
> with boots on the ground" to the World Bank/Google agreement that made
> some noise earlier this year.
> 
> The closing session offered summaries of the panels that had taken place
> in parallel. A summary of the summaries was: "Free the data!" (instead
> of keeping it in silos where it is difficult for others to access and use).
> 
> One of the visions that Jack Dangermond, founder and president of Esri,
> shared, is that over more than 40 years in the field of GIS, he had
> witnessed a few revolutionary technological changes: remote sensing,
> GPS, and now, crowd-sourcing.
> 
> The main points of Esri's presentations that might be of interest here are:
> - the recently released version 2.0 of ArcGIS editor for OSM
> (https://esriosmeditor.codeplex.com/),
> - the general move towards "the cloud", with the ability to share
> hundreds of thousands of maps online, even for those without their own
> server,
> - the possibility to easily create (point) map layers from spreadsheets
> (containing geo-coordinates columns) ("as easy as drag and drop"),
> - data collection tools on mobile devices (directly derived from data
> models).
> They also recalled that they have a program to supply software licenses
> to nonprofit organizations, which could apply to HOT (at least).
> 
> HXL (Humanitarian eXchange Language) is a draft standard, initiated by
> OCHA, designed to address the problem that "information sharing is
> becoming the bottleneck to efficient aid".
> 
> This conference allowed me to meet people from the Red Cross, MapAction,
> UN-OCHA, USAID/OTI, ACTED,... and GIS and information officers from
> South Sudan and Pakistan. By the way, who would like to help organize a
> mapping party in Islamabad?
> 
> I also had the pleasure to meet St?phane Henriod, who is interested in
> natural disasters data and in contributing to OSM in Tajikistan, as you
> may have seen on the HOT list, and Robert Colombo, who was "the guy in
> the audience always asking many good, thought provoking, questions" (and
> had activated SBTF, GisCorps and HOT to collect health facilities info
> for Libya, from his position at WHO in Tunis). And it was, as always, a
> pleasure to be able to chat with Fred Moine, who must now be back in
> Haiti for IOM. Thanks to Mikel for introducing me to the panel
> moderator, and to Nicolas for introducing me to his contacts who were
> likely to be at the conference.
> 
> But maybe the best surprise for me was an "African citizen" (who works
> in the UN) who came to me after my presentation to tell me that he
> thought that OSM could be a development and democratization tool that
> African youths, who have for instance contributed to the recent
> democratic change in Senegal, could use to organize themselves and to
> manage their own communities. This matched perfectly the vision that we
> had in Haiti with Nicolas... So let's make it happen!
> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> Jean-Guilhem
> 
> 
> 
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 13:29:23 -0400
> From: tim <timothieb at gmail.com>
> To: hot at openstreetmap.org
> Subject: [HOT] Activation working group
> Message-ID:
>    <CANnyER37B9OaPATQ02mMiemArup1pSLmJSfiFUNYDNtwcpEQbg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> Hoping to join the call tomorrow - but have not be able to connect the
> last two times I tried to get onto the #hot IRC channel for calls. It
> just hangs.
> 
> Regardless here is some food for thought.
> 
> 1. In our emergency response agency you could categorize our
> activation / plan guidance into two groups: the first group guidance
> is specifc to incidents of a certain type e.g. an earthquake
> activation, a heat wave activation, a flood activation; the second
> group is specific to operations / response needs e.g.debris clearance,
> evacuation, food distribution - which could be triggered by a range of
> different incidents and can be pulled off the shelf, mixed and matched
> - a more modular approach.
> 
> 2. You may have seen the message below from the crisis mappers list
> already but thought I would attach it for anyone who didn't.
> 
> Tim
> 
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: John Crowley <bostoncello at gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, Apr 11, 2012 at 12:15 PM
> Subject: [CrisisMappers] Disaster Songbook: coordinating the crowd
> To: "crisismappers at googlegroups.com" <crisismappers at googlegroups.com>
> 
> Friends,
> 
> As I awoke this morning to news that we might be replaying the Boxing
> Day tsunami from 2004 all over again, I watched the actions across my
> various email, skype, and twitter channels and got anxious. We have
> made so much progress on technology and practice since 2004, and we
> now have a community of dedicated and talented crisis mappers, and
> yet, our coordination is still not where it could be.
> 
> I realized that I had no ability to predict who was awake and who was
> working which issue. Did we need imagery; which areas of interest
> (AOIs) and when would the next potential satellite pass be? Did we
> need maps; how current are those areas in either Google MapMaker or
> OpenStreetMap? Did we have a method of pulling in social media and
> making sense of it; or would we wait for activation? Yes, had the
> emergency unfolded differently, we would have got to these questions
> eventually, but wouldn't it be great if questions like these--or
> perhaps better ones--were deeply ingrained in all our heads, like a
> musician know his or her scales?
> 
> For a while now, I have been thinking about bringing concepts from
> jazz into humanitarian information management. As a classically
> trained cellist, I had to relearn to think in this way, as my
> experience has been very different. For thirty years, I was taught how
> to realize "scores"--musical blueprints that specify in great detail
> what each voice should be doing at any given moment in the music work.
> That approach works when you have a full understanding of the universe
> of possibilities--when the score is a completed architecture and just
> needs to be "recreated." This is the approach of many disaster
> management agencies. That said, with disasters, improvisation is
> needed; we need to make the music as we go, and we cannot predict what
> any given actor will need to do at any one time.
> 
> That said, however 'unspecified and unscoped' the response operation
> may become does not necessarily mean we as crisis mappers need to be
> 'out of harmony or rhythm.' In jazz, there is a shared oral tradition
> that everyone learns: a set of melodies, harmonies, and rhythms and a
> morality around how to interact using those shared patterns in an
> ensemble. Together, musicians with such a common understanding can
> take even a fragment of a melody and create incredible structures that
> they did not have planned out when they played the first note. What if
> we had such a system for our crisis mapping work? What if we could
> know who is doing what with which tool and community, and how it all
> is weaving together into a (harmonious) whole, without over-specifying
> who does what or recreating ossified bureaucracies that move slowly?
> 
> Yes, we are making progress towards this end with shared protocols,
> trainings, and experiments. But we need to bring those efforts
> together again. We need to develop the ingrained, practical knowledge
> sometimes called metis.
> 
> I would like to advocate that we start work on such a song book, so
> that the next major disaster, we all have a basic song list to play
> off (with all the melodies, chords, and rhythms implied), and the
> ability to predict what each other will be doing, even if only in
> rough outlines. That way, we can improvise more effectively together.
> 
> Who wants to jam? We need to build some riffs.
> 
> John Crowley
> 
> Research Fellow at the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and
> Lead for the Camp Roberts Experiments @ NDU/STAR-TIDES
> 
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
> Groups "CrisisMappers" group.
> To post to this group, send email to crisismappers at googlegroups.com.
> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
> crisismappers+unsubscribe at googlegroups.com.
> For more options, visit this group at
> http://groups.google.com/group/crisismappers?hl=en.
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 21:26:23 +0200
> From: Jean-Guilhem Cailton <jgc at arkemie.com>
> To: Fr?d?ric Bonifas <fredericbonifas at gmail.com>
> Cc: hot at openstreetmap.org
> Subject: Re: [HOT] Mali follow-up: OrbView-3 images of Anefis,
>    And?ramboukane and Aguelhok available
> Message-ID: <4F85DADF.1070203 at arkemie.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> Hi,
> 
> The OrbView-3 images for these three towns are now integrated in the
> Tile Service at the same URL previously given
> (i.e.:
> for JOSM:
> tms:http://osm.arkemie.org/cgi-bin/tiles/1.0.0/mali/{zoom}/{x}/{y}
> and for Potlatch 2:
> http://osm.arkemie.org/cgi-bin/tiles/1.0.0/mali/$z/$x/$y
> )
> 
> Best wishes,
> 
> Jean-Guilhem
> 
> 
> Le 08/04/2012 13:56, Fr?d?ric Bonifas a ?crit :
>> The google doc is already updated, and 3 Orbview3 images can be used
>> for the cities of Anefis, And?ramboukane and Aguelhok :
>> https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiGw62ddccqhdEZ4Vi1hVmRKNmVseHpFOWVrdWR2Nmc
>> 
>> Best
>> 
>> Fred
>> 
>> Le 8 avril 2012 13:41, Fr?d?ric Bonifas <fredericbonifas at gmail.com> a ?crit :
>>> Hi,
>>> 
>>> I have updated the Mali wiki page to emphasize the need for imagery
>>> and what can already be mapped :
>>> http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/2012_Mali_Crisis#Things_to_do
>>> 
>>> Best
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Fr?d?ric Bonifas
>>> +33672652807 skype:fredericbonifas
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> gpg 0x5939EAE2
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Wed, 11 Apr 2012 12:38:18 -0700 (PDT)
> From: Mikel Maron <mikel_maron at yahoo.com>
> To: Jean-Guilhem Cailton <jgc at arkemie.com>,    "hot at openstreetmap.org"
>    <hot at openstreetmap.org>
> Cc: OSM-talk <talk at openstreetmap.org>
> Subject: Re: [HOT] Feedback from the Red Cross, UN people,    and Esri:
>    YOU (OSM) are GREAT!!!
> Message-ID:
>    <1334173098.88956.YahooMailNeo at web161601.mail.bf1.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> thanks for the wonderful summary of the conference JGC, sounds like a great success ... can we get this up on the HOT blog?
> ?
> * Mikel Maron *?+14152835207 @mikel s:mikelmaron
> 
> 
>> ________________________________
>> From: Jean-Guilhem Cailton <jgc at arkemie.com>
>> To: hot at openstreetmap.org 
>> Cc: OSM-talk <talk at openstreetmap.org> 
>> Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2012 4:47 PM
>> Subject: [HOT] Feedback from the Red Cross, UN people, and Esri: YOU (OSM) are GREAT!!!
>> 
>> 
>> Hi, 
>> 
>> Last week, I was at the conference "GIS for the United Nations and
>      the International Community", a conference organized by UNITAR's
>      Operational Satellite Application Programme (UNOSAT) and Esri,
>      April 3-5, 2012, at the World Meteorological Organization, in
>      Geneva, Switzerland. 
>> 
>> The main message I'd like to get back to each and everyone of you,
>      from the almost unanimous feedback I received and witnessed while
>      I was there, is that OpenStreetMap is rather well known and very
>      much appreciated among the people who attended the conference. It
>      is difficult to carry across the kind of recognition and
>      gratefulness that I felt for the work of OSM volunteers, and no
>      expression can be exaggerated to convey it. I am not saying that
>      Ban Ki-moon knows about OSM as much as he probably knows about
>      Google, for instance, but at least the UN people connected in some
>      (possibly remote) way to GIS know about it, and some are really
>      well aware of the strengths (and also of course of the weaknesses)
>      of OSM. 
>> 
>> Even in the panel that I attended in the first panel session,
>      "Geographic Information in Postcrisis - Transition to Stability
>      and Redevelopment", where OSM was not explicitly on the agenda, it
>      came up in the knowledgeable and lively discussion that followed,
>      with some strong opinions expressed about the "commercial"
>      character of the licence (from the point of view of this mostly
>      humanitarian audience), and the restrictions it implies, a topic
>      that deserves more development and to which I'll come back later
>      in another post. 
>> 
>> The next day, I was a panelist in "Open Data and the Crowd:
>      Collaborating for Action", a panel moderated by Ryan Lanclos,
>      Esri, where I had been invited at the last minute to represent
>      H.O.T. It was a really very interesting panel, with Lars Bromley,
>      UNITAR/UNOSAT, Jihad Abdalla, Emergency Officer at UNICEF/EMOPS,
>      Andrej Verity, UNOCHA, and Fr?d?ric Zanetta, IFRC. UNOSAT had made
>      their own experiments about crowd-sourcing, and were well aware of
>      its difficulties. I presented OSM in general, and in particular
>      the remote mobilization for Haiti (with an extract of Tim
>      Berners-Lee video at TED 2010) followed by field projects there,
>      with the example of the STM_020 project in Saint Marc, Haiti,
>      where I had just spent a month (I'll also come back to this
>      later). I think, judging from later interventions, that I managed
>      to get across the message that OSM is first of all a community
>      (rather than a "crowd"). A similar point was also later expressed
>      from the audience, with someone saying that organizations should
>      "engage" with the "crowd", not "use" it. In his conclusion, Andrej
>      Verity encouraged the audience "not to be afraid" to engage "the
>      crowd". 
>> After this panel, my personal feeling was an exhilarating one that
>      apparently everyone, from the panel and the interventions from the
>      audience, had a desire to move forward, iteratively improving
>      cooperation processes, and solving problems as they might arise. 
>> 
>> In the next panel that I attended, of particular interest was the
>      presentation by Ren? Saameli, of the ICRC, of the mapping of
>      Walikale, DR Congo, to support the Red Cross water supply project
>      there, jointly by remote OSM volunteers, who digitized the
>      satellite image acquired by the Red Cross, by local Red Cross
>      representative and correspondents, who collected field
>      information, like names of streets and suburbs or points of
>      interest, on Walking Papers (with no need for GPS units - which
>      would be too costly if this process is to be repeated on a large
>      scale), and remote OSM volunteers again, who entered WP info into
>      the database, to produce a complete and accurate map of the town.
>      Analyzes, such as population repartition estimation based on
>      digitized buildings, could then also be conducted. The ICRC was so
>      pleased by this project, as well as previous joint work with OSM
>      (like for mapping Osh in Kirghiztan during the 2010 troubles
>      there) that he declared that they are preparing a Memorandum of
>      Understanding with HOT, and envision the possibility to have
>      volunteers who would be both "Red Cross" and "HOT", as the Red
>      Cross and OSM are both mainly volunteers movements. Big credit
>      goes to Fr?d?ric Bonifas for building this trust relationship over
>      the years. 
>> Here is an interview about this collaborative mapping: http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/interview/2012/mapping-interview-2012-04-05.htm
>> Getting closer to the Red Cross and its millions of volunteers
>      worldwide, for those interested, could be a way to bridge the
>      missing link between the potential of OSM tools and the (mostly
>      unmapped and unconnected) local communities of the developing
>      world, where they could be really useful to make a difference. 
>> And this could also be a popularity boost for OSM, by making lay
>      people aware of the link between maps and humanitarian action. 
>> Like Ren? said off the record, it could be a reply from
>      "humanitarians with boots on the ground" to the World Bank/Google
>      agreement that made some noise earlier this year. 
>> 
>> The closing session offered summaries of the panels that had taken
>      place in parallel. A summary of the summaries was: "Free the
>      data!" (instead of keeping it in silos where it is difficult for
>      others to access and use). 
>> 
>> One of the visions that Jack Dangermond, founder and president of
>      Esri, shared, is that over more than 40 years in the field of GIS,
>      he had witnessed a few revolutionary technological changes: remote
>      sensing, GPS, and now, crowd-sourcing.
>> 
>> The main points of Esri's presentations that might be of interest
>      here are: 
>> - the recently released version 2.0 of ArcGIS editor for OSM (https://esriosmeditor.codeplex.com/), 
>> - the general move towards "the cloud", with the ability to share
>      hundreds of thousands of maps online, even for those without their
>      own server, 
>> - the possibility to easily create (point) map layers from
>      spreadsheets (containing geo-coordinates columns) ("as easy as
>      drag and drop"), 
>> - data collection tools on mobile devices (directly derived from
>      data models). 
>> They also recalled that they have a program to supply software
>      licenses to nonprofit organizations, which could apply to HOT (at
>      least). 
>> 
>> HXL (Humanitarian eXchange Language) is a draft standard,
>      initiated by OCHA, designed to address the problem that
>      "information sharing is becoming the bottleneck to efficient aid". 
>> 
>> This conference allowed me to meet people from the Red Cross,
>      MapAction, UN-OCHA, USAID/OTI, ACTED,... and GIS and information
>      officers from South Sudan and Pakistan. By the way, who would like
>      to help organize a mapping party in Islamabad? 
>> 
>> I also had the pleasure to meet St?phane Henriod, who is
>      interested in natural disasters data and in contributing to OSM in
>      Tajikistan, as you may have seen on the HOT list, and Robert
>      Colombo, who was "the guy in the audience always asking many good,
>      thought provoking, questions" (and had activated SBTF, GisCorps
>      and HOT to collect health facilities info for Libya, from his
>      position at WHO in Tunis). And it was, as always, a pleasure to be
>      able to chat with Fred Moine, who must now be back in Haiti for
>      IOM.
>      Thanks to Mikel for introducing me to the panel moderator, and to
>      Nicolas for introducing me to his contacts who were likely to be
>      at the conference.
>> 
>> But maybe the best surprise for me was an "African citizen" (who
>      works in the UN) who came to me after my presentation to tell me
>      that he thought that OSM could be a development and
>      democratization tool that African youths, who have for instance
>      contributed to the recent democratic change in Senegal, could use
>      to organize themselves and to manage their own communities. This
>      matched perfectly the vision that we had in Haiti with Nicolas...
>      So let's make it happen! 
>> 
>> Best wishes, 
>> 
>> Jean-Guilhem 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> HOT mailing list
>> HOT at openstreetmap.org
>> http://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>> 
>> 
>> 
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