[Tagging] Postindustrial Castle

Martin Koppenhoefer dieterdreist at gmail.com
Fri Oct 16 08:49:56 UTC 2015


2015-10-16 10:02 GMT+02:00 John Willis <johnw at mac.com>:

> It just feels weird to tag a more modern structure never used as a castle
> as a castle.
>
> You are right - the duck test tells me it is an imposing historic
> building. And yea, it looks a bit like a castle and is named "castle" -
> like the disney castle - but it's style is to mimic a castle - it was never
> meant to really be one. It is a rich person's house.
>


You are reading "castle" as a defensive structure, aren't structures like
these castles as well:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palace_of_Versailles (ok, that's a palace in
English, but a ch√Ęteau in French and a Schloss in German) and according to
the historic=castle page in the wiki, these should be tagged with
castle_type=palace (or manor or stately when smaller / for lesser nobles)

And btw., you have not yet answered the question regarding the
Neuschwanstein case. I could name a similar example (besides the other
Ludwig II castles in Bavaria), much smaller, here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichtenstein_Castle_%28W%C3%BCrttemberg%29
Or also this one, residence of the emperor of Germany (prussian enclave),
but not actually a defensive structure (but "fake defensive"):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohenzollern_Castle

Do you agree these are castles? This is the wiki list about castles:
http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Key:castle_type

These 19th century castles are all (or mostly) considered castles by the
Germans (actually they are either "Burg", or "Schloss", Lichtenstein and
Hohenzollern both are "Burg", the same word as for the medieval defensive
castles), but they are clearly very different from medieval castles and
never have worked as defensive structures (neither have they been intended
to be such). Here's a very small example of an actual medieval castle:
http://www.hohen-hundersingen.de/
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burg_Hohenhundersingen
This one was destroyed mostly in 1530 and the tower is just 5x5 meters with
the only entrance in 6 meters above ground (formerly accessible by a ladder
that you be retracted). It surely isn't of much significance (there are
more impressive castles in the close surroundings, I'd guess within 10 km
there will be at least 5 others), but it clearly was intended for defensive
purposes. I brought this significance thing up, because that seems to be
the distinctive criterion for the three castle types "palace", "manor" and
"stately".

Cheers,
Martin
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