[Tagging] Do-it-yourself versus hardware stores

Paul Johnson baloo at ursamundi.org
Thu Feb 11 11:49:11 UTC 2016


Good timing, Colin.  I was about to bring up what differentiates DIY from,
say, a lumberyard or a steel yard, which focuses primarily on the materials
wholesale and may (for example, Parr Lumber
<http://www.openstreetmap.org/way/294108329>) incidentally have a small
hardware and paint shop (at radically inflated prices).

On Thu, Feb 11, 2016 at 5:31 AM, Colin Smale <colin.smale at xs4all.nl> wrote:

> Large stocks of building materials and supporting construction materials
> is what I would probably call a "builders merchant".
>
>
>
> http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/builders%27-merchant?q=builders+merchant
>
> But note the third example sentence: "The boundaries between builders'
> merchants and DIY operators is becoming increasingly blurred."
>
> Buying enough stuff to put up a shelf might come under "DIY" but the same
> stuff in quantities to build a new room extension is a different ballgame
> and then I would search for a builders merchant in the area, not a DIY shop.
>
> //colin
>
> On 2016-02-11 11:31, John Willis wrote:
>
>
>
> Javbw
>
> On Feb 11, 2016, at 5:26 PM, Martin Koppenhoefer <dieterdreist at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> ot (they'd sell wire and nails/screws, glue, paint and even small amounts
> of gypsum or cement, also smaller extruded metal profiles might be
> available, or chainlink mesh,
>
>
> Usually they sell small amounts of many materials for very tiny projects,
> but usually the small amounts are for repairs of exists ting things.
>
> Many people repairing a toilet or a door may go to a hardware store. But
> no one finishing a room or building a bathroom is. The DIY is for "you can
> renovate the bathroom or build a deck" yourself - anyone should be able to
> patch a hole in the wall or repair a leaky faucet - that isn't the DIY
> meaning. I built a workshop in our garden from lumber and metal sheeting
> from a DIY. I bought a specialty tool to repair an old sink at a hardware
> store.
>
> Focusing on products available is the key. Making a distinction that is
> easy for mappers to discern in wiki (or iD preset) without cracking the OED
> and without having them make a judgment call on the quality of service (I
> have met morons and well-versed professionals in both) are very good things
> to avoid.  DIY stores are open to the public - whereas many counties have
> restrictions on certain types of materials available. Though a pro or
> contractor may buy materials at a DIY shop, that is also not important - as
> the DIY sells bulk building supplies to *anyone* - that is the important
> part.
>
> Hardware shop: focus on:
>
> Tools (power, hand)
> Hardware (fasteners, hinges, etc)
> Consumables / paint
>
> And Minor stock of materials (small lumber, garden)
>
> ~~~~~
>
>
> DIY: focus on:
> Large stocks of above, plus
>
> Focus on Large stocks of building materials.
>
> In addition, may include:
> Large stocks of fixtures/ home appliances / Outdoor tools/ farm supplies /
> landscaping supplies
>
> Large stocks of supporting construction materials.
>
> Again, we're in a world where the DIY shop (Home Depot) has crushed the
> "general hardware" store (Ace), so there should be a lot more DIY stores in
> some regions than "hardware" shops.
>
> Javbw
> _______________________________________________
> Tagging mailing list
> Tagging at openstreetmap.org
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Tagging mailing list
> Tagging at openstreetmap.org
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/tagging
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <http://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/tagging/attachments/20160211/c312e966/attachment.html>


More information about the Tagging mailing list