[Tagging] Tourist bus stop

Warin 61sundowner at gmail.com
Tue Sep 17 04:10:36 UTC 2019


On 17/09/19 04:11, Paul Allen wrote:
>
>
> On Mon, 16 Sep 2019 at 18:25, Martin Koppenhoefer 
> <dieterdreist at gmail.com <mailto:dieterdreist at gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>
>     is "motorcar" a term that is common in British English?
>
>
> Not much.
>
>
>     How do you tag the generic bus class in Britain?
>
>
> Is there such a thing?  There are buses which operate to a timetable 
> and anyone may board
> or alight at specified stops (perhaps elsewhere at the driver's 
> discretion).  There are coaches
> use for day trips and coaches for long distance.  All are classed by 
> the UK gov't as PSVs
> (as are taxis, minibuses and stretch limos).
>
>     FWIW, the common term "bus" is already taken for buses acting as
>     public service vehicles,
>
>
> Except "PSV" doesn't mean what you think it means in the UK.  But I'm 
> happy with how OSM
> uses the term bus, because that's how most people in the UK use it, 
> and I think is what our
> gov't calls a "registered local service."
>
>     so there must be something else for the generic vehicle class for
>     buses.
>
>
> There must?  Why?  I can't think of it.  There may very well be one, 
> in common usage,
> but it doesn't spring to mind.
>
>     I am not insisting on "motorbus", but it seemed to fit with the
>     rest of the terms, and it didn't seem to have specific meaning,
>     which the currently documented "tourist_bus" obviously has.
>
>
> There was a time when all buses were pulled by horses.

? Umm were they not coaches? Cobb & Co etc.
https://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/britain-1700-to-1900/transport-1750-to-1900/coaches-1750-to-1900/
1700s on.
Oh  I found horsebuses were later.. 1824... humm never heard of them 
before.

> Then along came Daimler, Otto
> and others and eventually there were new-fangled motorbuses.  Proudly 
> called motorbuses
> because they had a motor instead of being pulled by horses.  More time 
> passed and
> horse-drawn buses became a rarity, and what were once called 
> motorbuses were simply
> called buses.  Although horse-drawn buses are exceedingly rare, they 
> would also fit into
> the generic, as yet unnamed, category that includes buses, coaches, 
> minibuses, etc.
> Motorbus is pretty much an archaism.
>
> Since a bus and coach are extremes in terms of size and weight of 
> PSVs, and look
> very similar from the outside, I'd be reasonably happy to accept 
> access=bus as meaning
> both.  I can foresee the possibility that buses are allowed but 
> coaches are not, but is it
> likely?  No doubt somebody will chip in with an example. Actually, I 
> can think of one:
> an automatic vehicle barrier that opens if it detects a bus (local 
> registered service)
> but not any other type of vehicle, so it would exclude coaches.  Yes, 
> such a thing
> exists.

Tourist coaches here deliver there passengers and then go elsewhere to 
park in the busy places.
They cannot park in a regular 'bus stop' as those get used by the 
regular passenger services.

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